Impossible to Possible

Science Interactive Lectures


Dinosaur Appearance: New Discoveries

Dinosaurs are amazing animals and they are still alive today. Really! We just call them birds! We usually find dinosaurs as fossil bones and these tell us a lot about their biology, including their appearance, physiology and habits. However, sometimes we are lucky enough to find dinosaur fossils preserving the soft parts of dinosaurs, including skin, feathers and even their organs, which gives us even more information. Join dinosaur palaeontologist Dr Michael Pittman from the University of Hong Kong to find out how he uses lasers to find new information about dinosaur soft parts. Find out about the earliest feathered dinosaurs and what their soft parts tell us about birds. Get ready to travel back in time to the world of dinosaurs!

Curriculum links:
Science curriculum S1-S3: Unit 3 Looking at Living Things
Biology curriculum S4-S6: Part 2 Genetics and Evolution (Compulsory Part)

Date Time
4.3.2017 (Sat) 12:00 noon – 1:00pm
5.3.2017 (Sun) 12:00 noon – 1:00pm
 
Venue:
Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Speaker:
Dr Michael Pittman, the University of Hong Kong
Remarks:
 

What Exactly Is Climate Change and Why Should We Care?

The climate is changing and it is rapidly transforming the world around us. This interactive lecture takes us on a journey through time from ice ages to ancient civilisations, through rapid industrialisation and to the present day to see how and why the Earth's climate has changed throughout history. Then, in the context of the current human-induced warming, David Saddington shows us how current climate change is so much more than a scientific process. What exactly is climate change and why should we care?

Curriculum links:
Biology curriculum S4-S6: Part 3 Organisms and Environment (Compulsory Part) and Part 6 Applied Ecology (Elective Part)
Geography curriculum S4-S6: Part 3 Confronting Global Challenges (Compulsory Part)

Date Time
8.3.2017 (Wed) 4:00pm – 5:15pm
10.3.2017 (Fri) 2:00pm – 3:15pm
 
Venue:
Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Speaker:
David Saddington, climate change communicator
Remarks:
 

How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch

Maybe it was an asteroid impact, a nuclear war, or a viral pandemic. Whatever the cause, the world as we know it has ended and you and your community of survivors must start again. What key knowledge would you need to not only survive in the immediate post-apocalyptic aftermath, but avert another Dark Ages and accelerate the rebooting of civilisation from scratch? Living in the modern world, we have become disconnected from the basic processes that support our lives, as well as the beautiful fundamentals of science that enable you to relearn things for yourself. The knowledge is a grand thought experiment on the behind-the-scenes fundamentals of how our world works, and what drove the progression of civilisation over the centuries.

Curriculum links:
Chemistry curriculum S4-S6: Part 1 Planet Earth (Compulsory Part)
Geography curriculum S4-S6: Part 3 Confronting Global Challenges (Compulsory Part)

Date Time
12.3.2017 (Sun) 4:15pm – 5:30pm
13.3.2017 (Mon) 1:30pm – 2:45pm
 
Venue:
Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Speaker:
Professor Lewis Dartnell, University of Westminster
Remarks:
 

The Future of Genetic Testing

Famous scientists Watson and Crick worked out the structure of DNA in the 1950s. Technology in genetics now allows us to sequence or map out the full human genome. Watson had his genome sequenced in 2007 at a cost of US$1.5 million. Nowadays, the cost of sequencing is now under US$1,000. In a few years, everyone can have their genome sequenced; and scientists are working out how to make change to the human genome. What next?

Curriculum links:
Biology curriculum S4-S6: Part 1 Cell and Molecules of Life (Compulsory Part) and Part 8 Biotechnology (Elective Part)

Date Time
14.3.2017 (Tue) 4:00pm – 5:15pm
 
Venue:
Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Speaker:
Professor Joyce Harper, Institute for Women’s Health, University College London
Remarks:
 

Reproduction without Sex – What Does Technology Have to Offer?

Since the birth of the first IVF baby in 1978, it has been possible to have children without sex. We can collect eggs and sperm and mix them in the laboratory to make human embryos. This technology has allowed women to delay having children and also to create new types of families. The science in this area is still evolving but new technology such as making eggs and sperm from adult stem cells, artificial wombs and genome editing may soon be a reality.

Curriculum links:
Biology curriculum S4-S6: Part 1 Cell and Molecules of Life (Compulsory Part) and Part 8 Biotechnology (Elective Part)

Date Time
15.3.2017 (Wed) 10:45am – 12:00 noon
 
Venue:
Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Speaker:
Professor Joyce Harper, Institute for Women’s Health, University College London
Remarks: