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Science Theatre

Education Programme for "Animal Grossology"

Film Title Date Time
Armoured Animals 13-07-2016 (Wednesday)
03-08-2016 (Wednesday)
04-09-2016 (Sunday)
2:00pm - 2:25pm
Curious Imposters 13-07-2016 (Wednesday)
03-08-2016 (Wednesday)
04-09-2016 (Sunday)
2:40pm - 3:05pm
You are What you Sense 13-07-2016 (Wednesday)
03-08-2016 (Wednesday)
04-09-2016 (Sunday)
3:20pm - 4:20pm
Stretched to the Limit 24-07-2016 (Sunday)
21-08-2016 (Sunday)
25-09-2016 (Sunday)
2:00pm - 2:25pm
Bad Reputations 24-07-2016 (Sunday)
21-08-2016 (Sunday)
25-09-2016 (Sunday)
2:40pm - 3:05pm
Seeing the Pattern 09-10-2016 (Sunday)
16-10-2016 (Sunday)
26-10-2016 (Wednesday)
2:00pm - 2:25pm
Life in the Dark 09-10-2016 (Sunday)
16-10-2016 (Sunday)
26-10-2016 (Wednesday)
2:40pm - 3:05pm

Curriculum Links: S1-S3 Science "Looking at Living Things", S4-S6 Biology Compulsory Part "Organisms and Environment" and Elective Part "Applied Ecology"

Armoured Animals
Both the rhino and the hedgehog protect their bodies with formidable armour. Are these defences really what they seem? The rhino's thick folds of skin are in fact surprisingly sophisticated radiators. But what other purpose could a hedgehog's spines have apart from protection? Catching apples, perhaps?

Curious Imposters
Some animals have mastered the art of deception. The cuckoo lays its eggs in the nest of other birds and tricks them into raising its young, while the spooky looking Death's-head hawk-moth deceives hundreds of bees to steal their honey. How do these cheats and imposters get away with it?

You are What You Sense
Chris Packham explores the remarkable ways animals use their senses. Focusing on dogs, he discovers how their powerful sense of smell creates a bizarre alternative reality.

Stretched to the Limit
Some animals appear to have taken Nature's gifts and stretched them to extreme limits. With these two natural curiosities one creature has ended up with a superstretched neck, the other a stretchy tongue. In both cases Nature has found a way to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary.

Bad Reputations
Early reports of a wild, hairy creature in the jungles of Africa gave the gorilla a fearsome reputation and the vampire bat, with its strange face and nocturnal habits, also gave rise to horrific stories and myths. However, the true nature of these animals turned out to be very different.

Seeing the Pattern
Animals that are beautifully patterned or brilliantly coloured have attracted the attention of collectors for centuries. In this episode David Attenborough looks at two examples of animal patterns that have bedazzled and baffled science for a long time, and uses modern tools to unlock their secrets. 

Life in the Dark
The owl and the giant squid have adapted to life in the dark. Owl eyes are so huge they can't even move them within their sockets. But the giant squid has the largest eyes known in the animal kingdom. But where does it hide and what is it looking at?

 

Venue: Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Language: English narration with Chinese subtitles
Enquiries: 2732 3223 (Mon to Fri: 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm, except public holidays)
Free admission on a first come, first served basis


 

Science Theatre

Film Title Date Time
What's Really in Our Food? – Spreads 30-10-2016 (Sunday)
13-11-2016 (Sunday)
23-11-2016 (Wednesday)
2:00pm - 2:30pm
What's Really in Our Food? – Cheeses 30-10-2016 (Sunday)
13-11-2016 (Sunday)
23-11-2016 (Wednesday)
2:40pm - 3:10pm
What's Really in Our Food? - Nuts 30-10-2016 (Sunday)
13-11-2016 (Sunday)
23-11-2016 (Wednesday)

3:20pm - 3:50pm

Curriculum Links: S1-S3 Science "A Healthy Body"

 

What's Really in Our Food? – Spreads
We slather on over a hundred million dollars worth of the stuff every year. But how much do we really know about what we're putting on our toast? Is there any nutrition in our favourite spreads or are they simply convenience in a jar laden with salt, fat and sugar?

What's Really in Our Food? – Cheeses
Britain is a nation that's big on cheese, but we also have a very high rate of heart disease. Tonight we investigate the link. We also discover some good news for soft cheese lovers, and the bad news on mould.

What's Really in Our Food? - Nuts
Are they little more than a fatty snack or a tasty superfood? Where do our nuts come from and are their any health risks? We also investigate the role nuts could play in lowering bad cholesterol, and providing our bodies with essential nutrients.

 

Venue: Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Language: English narration with Chinese subtitles
Enquiries: 2732 3223 (Mon to Fri: 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm, except public holidays)
Free admission on a first come, first served basis


 

Education Programme for "T-Rex Revealed ─ The Augmented + Virtual Reality Experience"

Film Title Date Time
Planet Dinosaur – New Giants 14-12-2016 (Wednesday)
18-12-2016 (Sunday)
2:00pm - 3:00pm
Planet Dinosaur – Killer Elite 14-12-2016 (Wednesday)
18-12-2016 (Sunday)
3:15pm - 4:15pm

Curriculum Links: S1-S3 Science

 

Planet Dinosaur – New Giants
This episode focuses on the new giants, the heavyweights of the dinosaur world. It is only in recent years that experts have unearthed the biggest dinosaurs that ever lived.

One monster, the immense Argentinosaurus, eclipsed all others, being more than seven times as heavy as the Diplodocus. A single backbone was bigger than a human.

For years, these giants were considered immune to attack from any predator - until the discovery of the Mapusaurus, a new giant killer whose fate appeared to be inextricably linked to the Argentinosaurus.

Planet Dinosaur – Killer Elite
The third episode looks at the last generation of killer dinosaurs - carnivores that took killing to a new level.

By the end of the Cretaceous period - 75 million years ago - these gigantic and specialised hunter-killers had spread throughout the globe. In the southern continents, it was the powerful and muscular abelisaurids that reigned supreme, but it was the famous tyrannosaurids (or tyrant dinosaurs) that dominated in the north.

Whilst the northern Daspletosaurus hunted in gangs, using its highly developed smell and hearing to take down opponents like the horned rhino-sized beast Chasmosaurus, in the southern hemisphere the small-skulled Majungasaurus reigned. And though the sharp-toothed Majungasaurus was an efficient killer of the much smaller feathered Rahonavis, that did not stop it from occasionally turning cannibal and hunting its own.
 

 

Venue: Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Language: English narration with Chinese subtitles
Enquiries: 2732 3223 (Mon to Fri: 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm, except public holidays)
Free admission on a first come, first served basis

 

 

Last Modified: 13-09-2016

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